Your Brain Is More Powerful Than All The Computers On Earth

The human brain is truly awesome. I have a friend who is very clever. Smart. Gifted. In fact, he's the person who put this website together for me. I often wonder through what genetic set of circumstances, was this guy able to do things, to see things, to imagine things that I would struggle to accomplish. Is it just learning? Is it an interest in computing; in teaching? I have no idea. All I know is that when Rick starts to get excited over programming code and writing code, I struggle to keep my eyes from glazing over.

The answer is in the brain. Between your ears. Whether through nature or nurture, our minds are capable of the most amazing feats imaginable.

A typical, healthy one houses some 200 billion nerve cells, which are connected to one another via hundreds of trillions of synapses. Each synapse functions like a microprocessor, and tens of thousands of them can connect a single neuron to other nerve cells. In the cerebral cortex alone, there are roughly 125 trillion synapses, which is about how many stars fill 1,500 Milky Way galaxies.

These synapses are, of course, so tiny (less than a thousandth of a millimetre in diameter) that humans haven't been able to see with great clarity what exactly they do and how, beyond knowing that their numbers vary over time. That is until now.

Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have spent the past few years engineering a new imaging model, which they call array tomography, in conjunction with novel computational software, to stitch together image slices into a three-dimensional image that can be rotated, penetrated and navigated. Their work appears in the journal Neuron this week.

To test their model, the team took tissue samples from a mouse whose brain had been bioengineered to make larger neurons in the cerebral cortex express a fluorescent protein (found in jellyfish), making them glow yellow-green. Because of this glow, the researchers were able to see synapses against the background of neurons.

They found that the brain's complexity is beyond anything they'd imagined, almost to the point of being beyond belief, says Stephen Smith, a professor of molecular and cellular physiology and senior author of the paper describing the study:

One synapse, by itself, is more like a microprocessor -- with both memory-storage and information-processing elements -- than a mere on/off switch. In fact, one synapse may contain on the order of 1,000 molecular-scale switches. A single human brain has more switches than all the computers and routers and Internet connections on Earth.

Smith adds that this gives us a glimpse into brain tissue at a level of detail never before attained: "The entire anatomical context of the synapses is preserved. You know right where each one is, and what kind it is."

While the study was set up to demonstrate array tomography's potential in neuroscience (which is starting to resemble astronomy), the team was surprised to find that a class of synapses that have been considered identical to one another actually contain certain distinctions. They hope to use their imaging model to learn more about those distinctions, identifying which are gained or lost during learning, after experiences such as trauma, or in neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer's.

In the meantime, the researchers Smith and Micheva are starting a company that is gathering funding for future work, and Stanford's Office of Technology Licensing has obtained a U.S. patent on array tomography and filed for a second. Watch this space................

The whole session appeared to be a waste of time.... nothing appeared to be working properly. I didn't lose consciousness. I didn't go into a trance, or at least I didn't think I did, and yet after that session, not only did I stop smoking but I actually enjoyed the process. Allen Carr (an extract from Easy Way to Stop Smoking).

Dear Phil, a note I just had to send to thank you for setting me free. I have not had a cigarette since I saw you and am still incredulous at the change, at the success, at the ease and how good I feel since your fabulous treatment session. I will be recommending your services to anyone I know who wants help, in particular my son who I am sure would also love to quit smoking. Kind regards.

F Mackenzie of Karratha

Hi there

It has been almost a year since I underwent a hypnosis session at your centre and I just wanted to let you know that it was very successful, I have not smoked since then.

Thanks for your help, I will highly recommend your centre to anyone trying to give up smoking.

Tess A